11 Things People With Chronic Illnesses Need to DO — fabwithfibro

 

Great list. I think I can handle it. http://themighty.com/2015/12/11-things-people-with-chronic-illnesses-need-to-do/

via 11 Things People With Chronic Illnesses Need to DO — fabwithfibro

Hey fibro friends, I found this on a terrific fibro blog I discovered today, called “Fab with Fibro” (which is what we all want to be, right?); the link is from The Mighty, one of my all-time favorite chronic illness (physical and mental) websites. They have a marvelous newsletter I highly recommend.

Anyway, I’ve been struggling with giving up my long-time dream of being a chaplain. Lots of tears, anger, envy toward the entire world of healthy people who can take any job they want without needing to think twice about health limitations…in other words, loads of grief with a big dose of self-pity mixed in. So when I read this list by The Mighty, it felt as though it was written specifically for me. So I thought I’d share this, with many thanks to fabwithfibro, for those of you who are coming bang up against fibro and other health limitations too.

gfancy_dahlia_pause-1

10 Ways to Live to 100

Floss and have a lot of sex is the takeaway from this one (very excellent article, actually)

TIME

No one really wants to think about aging, but let’s face it: the habits you practice now can play a role in how long you’ll live, and how much life you’ll have in your years.

The world’s oldest man, Polish immigrant Alexander Imich, passed away on Sunday in New York City at the age of 111. That’s way longer than the average American male life expectancy of 76, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Health.com: 13 Everyday Habits That Age You

While Imich told The New York Times that he chalked up his longevity to good genes, there are healthy habits you can pick up to help you live a longer, happier life. Here are some ideas:

Find a hobby
Doing something you find truly fulfilling will give you a sense of accomplishment, and can help reduce stress.

Floss!
Flossing does more than clean your teeth: Getting…

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5 Myths About Fibromyalgia

This is such an informative post about fibromyalgia I have to repost this! It clears up a number of common misconceptions about fibromyalgia I encounter on a regular basis.

Flourish with Fibro's Blog

Fibromyalgia is a widely misunderstood condition that causes widespread pain and fatigue. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with fibromyalgia, you may come across some myths and misconceptions while trying to learn all you can about the condition.

Here are the top 5 myths I always hear about fibro:

1. The China Doll – Fibro patients are fragile.

This myth can’t be further from the truth. Sometimes, fibro patients can be emotionally and physically sensitive, but it takes a ton of perseverance and strength to live with fibro. We can’t measure our strength by the number of miles we run or the number of pounds we bench-press  — instead, we measure our strength one day at a time. Today, I am strong enough to get out of bed. Tomorrow, I am strong enough to clean the house. And, the next day, I might be strong enough to try to take…

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two truths and a lie

Well, it looks as though I am being dragged back into the blogosphere despite a monster migraine, lured by my friend Liz over at Random Thoughts of a Lutheran Geek, who is running a “Two Truths and a Lie Blog Carnival” this weekend, darn her. It’s based upon the childhood game where you tell three truths about yourself, except that one, of course, is a lie, and everyone else has to guess which one the lie is. We usually played it at slumber parties and, truth be told, I was never very good at it, because I always blushed (the curse of the Irish for you) and giggled when I told my lie. At least here I have the advantage of not being seen!

So, here are my three, um, truths:

1  I thought about becoming an Episcopalian priest.
2. I was once engaged to the son of a millionaire.
3. I was once interviewed on MPR.

So go to the comments section and make your guesses!  And then play along on your own blog, link up and hop around the blogs to get to know each other better.  We will reveal the correct answers on our original posts on Monday February 28th so stop back to see if you were right!

Note: I revealed my correct answers in my comments section by mistake. You will find that I like to be different. Or difficult, depending upon your interpretation! And I was late besides–oops!

books: 2009

  1. The Eucharist and the Hunger of the World, Monika K. Hellwig
  2. Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews, Paula Fredriksen
  3. The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus, Amy-Jill Levine
  4. Fortress Introduction to The Gospels, Mark Allan Powell
  5. Social Science Commentary on the Synoptic Gospels, Bruce J. Malina and Richard Rohrbach
  6. John, the Maverick Gospel, Robert Kysar
  7. Written that you May Believe: Encountering Jesus in the Fourth Gospel, Sandra M. Schneiders, IHM
  8. The Middle Ages, Morris Bishop
  9. Models of the Church, Avery Dulles, SJ
  10. The Sacred Pipe, Joseph Brown
  11. A New Christian Paradigm: The Making of Post-Protestant Christianity, Ben M. Carter
  12. Jesus and the Quest for Meaning, Thomas H. West
  13. The Church Unfinished: Ecclesiology Through the Centuries, Bernard K. Prusak
  14. Salt: A World History, Mark Kurlansky
  15. Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World, Mark Kurlansky
  16. Jesus as a Figure in History: How Modern Historians View the Man from Galilee, Mark Kurlansky
  17. Paul–A Jew on the Margins, Calvin J. Roetzel
  18. The Spirituality of Paul, Thomas H. Tobin
  19. Navigating Paul: An Introduction to Key Theological Concepts, Jouette M. Bassler
  20. Angela’s Ashes, Frank McCourt
  21. The Hollow Crown: A History of Britain in the Late Middle Ages, Miri Rubin
  22. Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom, John O’Donohue
  23. The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million, Daniel Mendelsohn
  24. Whitethorn Woods, Maeve Binchy
  25. Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain & Ireland, Bryan Sykes
  26. The Shadow of the Wind, Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  27. The Rule of Four, Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason
  28. The Children of Henry VIII, Alison Weir
  29. On Hitler’s Mountain: Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood, Irmgard A. Hunt
  30. My Life with the Saints, James Martin, SJ
  31. The Monster of Florence: A True Story, Douglas Preston with Mario Spezi
  32. Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Why the Greeks Matter, Thomas Cahill
  33. How the Irish Saved Civilization, Thomas Cahill
  34. Christianity Rediscovered, Vincent J. Donovan
  35. Doors to the Sacred: A Historical Introduction to Sacraments in the Catholic Church, Joseph Martos
  36. The Catholic Myth: The Behavior and Beliefs of American Catholics, Andrew Greeley
  37. The Amber Room: The Fate of the World’s Greatest Lost Treasure, Catherine Scott-Clark and Adrian Levy
  38. No Place Like Home, Mary Higgins Clark
  39. The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History, John Barry
  40. The Last Knight: The Twilight of the Middles Ages and the Birth of the Modern Era, Norman Cantor
  41. Soldier from the War Returning: The Greatest Generation’s Troubled Homecoming from World War II, Thomas Childers
  42. The Basque History of the World, Mark Kurlansky
  43. Catherine the Great: Love, Sex, and Power, Virginia Rounding
  44. Elizabeth and Mary: Cousins, Rivals, and Queens, Jane Dunn
  45. Devil’s Brood, Sharon Kay Penman
  46. Falls the Shadow: A Novel, Sharon Kay Penman
  47. Queen Emma and the Vikings: Power, Love and Greed in 11th Century England, Harriet O’Brien
  48. Time and Chance, Sharon Kay Penman
  49. Dragon’s Lair, Sharon Kay Penman
  50. The Queen’s Man: A Medieval Mystery, Sharon Kay Penman
  51. When Christ and his Saints Slept, Sharon Kay Penman
  52. The Reckoning, Sharon Kay Penman
  53. The Sunne in Splendor: A Novel of Richard III, Sharon Kay Penman
  54. The Year 1000: What Life was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium, Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger
  55. Here be Dragons, Sharon Kay Penman
  56. Walking on a Rolling Deck: Life on the Ark, Kathy Berken
  57. The Civilization of the Middle Ages, Norman Cantor
  58. Mistress of the Monarchy: The Life of Katherine Swynford, Duchess of Lancaster, Alison Weir
  59. Lucia: A Venetian Life in the Age of Napoleon, Andrea D. Robilant
  60. A Venetian Affair: A True Tale of Forbidden Love in the 18th Century, Andrea D. Robilant
  61. The Gift of the Jews: How a Tribe of Desert Nomads Changed the Way Everyone Thinks and Feels, Thomas Cahill
  62. Restoration London: From Poverty to Pets, from Medicine to Magic, from Slang to Sex, from Wallpaper to Women’s Rights, Liza Picard
  63. The Seville Communion, Arturo Perez-Oerveto
  64. In the Wake of the Plague: The Black Death and the World it Made, Norman Cantor
  65. The Lady Elizabeth: A Novel, Alison Weir
  66. Faith and Treason: The Story of the Gunpowder Plot, Antonia Fraser
  67. Blue Iris: Poems and Essays, Mary Oliver

This year’s list is dedicated to some of my favorite fellow bookworms: Aunts Barb and Jo, Emilie, Liz P., Liz H., Roxane S., and Kristine.

But most of all, this list is dedicated to my darling sister-in-law Fran, who shares my intense love of books and often subsidizes my Barnes and Noble habit, and to my mom, who instilled in me a love of the power of words and the magic of language, as well as an intense curiosity about the world around me.

 

RevGalBlogPals Friday Five: Pets

Friday Five: Pets

(Per Sophia over at RevGalBlogPals…) My son’s tiny beloved lizard, Elf, is looking and acting strange this week. His skin/scales are quite dark, and he is lethargic. We are adding vitamin drops to his lettuce and spinach and hoping and praying that he is just getting ready to shed his skin–but it’s too soon to tell. Others in the ring have also been worried about beloved pets this week. And, in the saddest news of all, Songbird has had to bid farewell to her precious Molly, the amazing dog who is well known to readers of her blog as a constant sacrament of God’s unconditional love.

So in memory of Molly, and in honor of all the beloved animal companions who bless our lives: tell us about the five most memorable pets you have known.
Come play along with me–either post your answers on you blog or, better yet, in the comment box! (Sorry to post this a day late–I fell asleep too early last night to finish.)

Barbara’s Memorable Pets:

1. When I was about six, I adopted an earthworm from my dad’s garden and named him Casey, after the boy at school I had a wild crush on. I loved Casey (both of them, actually.) One hot summer day, I devised a raft for Casey (the worm) on a small piece of torn-up shingle, and took him for a boat ride in a mud puddle in our driveway. My parents, watching from the window, decided it was about time for me to have a real pet, and that’s how Bridget came into our lives. The Casey story does not have a happy ending, though: Casey the boy moved away, and Casey the worm received a ceremonial burial in the rose garden.

2. We got Bridget, a miniature poodle (almost big enough to be a standard) through a group called Pet Haven, almost immediately after the Casey incident. She was, truly, my best friend for all of my growing up years; talk about representing God’s unconditional love. We took her everywhere with us. She was also brilliant–my dad loved teaching her tricks. One of his (their, I should say) favorites was teaching her to scratch fleas on command. She didn’t have fleas, you understand. I thought about trying to get her on David Letterman’s Stupid Pet Tricks, but never got around to it. When I came home from my scoliosis surgery, in terrible pain I went to bed immediately, and Bridget hopped up on the bed and very carefully and gently arranged herself so that she was nestled against me, head on my shoulder, magically, without hitting any of my painful spots (and there were plenty, believe me.) We had to put our beloved Bridget to sleep right after I graduated from college; she was 15-years-old.


3. About a year later we (mom and I) found my darling Molly, a cocker spaniel, at the Golden Valley Humane Society. I knew from the second I laid eyes on her that she was the puppy for us. She was picked up as a stray, and had apparently been abused. Molly had the absolute sweetest nature I have ever seen in a dog, and in a special way, we were soulmates. She could always tell when I was depressed, or my fibromyalgia was acting up, and she was always right there to comfort me. She also had a thing for flowers–we were always catching her out in the backyard sniffing them. When we had to put her to sleep, at the age of 14, (she had an abdominal cancer), we spread her ashes amongst the flowers she loved so much. I love to think of her resting there, helping the flowers grow.


4.
Warning: Do not let young children read this fish horror story. In my late twenties I decided I need some fish to help keep me company. So I trotted off the the pet store, purchased my little tank and fish goodies, and then selected my fish. I don’t remember the name of the breed (Bellas, maybe?), but they were stunningly beautiful, and the store owner assured me they were a very passive breed of fish, and not likely to harm each other. (Does anyone sense some foreshadowing here?) I enjoyed watching them swim about in their tiny tank, weaving in and out of the fronds of the plants I had so carefully purchased for their swimming pleasure. But soon, I began to notice that a few of my fish seemed to have disappeared. Then, one traumatic day, I caught the fish villain in the act: he was devouring another fish. The story only gets worse from here. A fish execution by toilet, remaining fish obviously suffering from PTSD. I’m not sure what this was supposed to teach me. That fish can be possessed? That the reality of evil extends even to little aquariums?


5. Luckily, my last pet story reaffirms my belief in the goodness of creation. My darling Fiona, the Uber-cocker spaniel, curled up against my bare feet as I type, is my best furry friend and provides me with all the loving, unconditional care anyone could possibly need. When my mom was dying, and I’d come home from the nursing home in tears, Fiona was right there waiting for me. And after mom died, for weeks the little fluffy creature wouldn’t leave my side; she clung to me, staring up at me with her big brown eyes that telegraphed her doggly love and concern. Fiona also loves to play; every single day, without fail, we must–and I do mean must–play with each of her toys in turn. She so loves her toys. She is my cuddly darling, and I hope to someday be the person she thinks I am.



25 random things about me

(I originally posted this on Facebook, but I wanted something semi-fun to post here today, so I thought I’d use this.)
1.I never liked poetry when I studied it in English class, but now I love reading it on my own. In fact, I’m becoming a poetry addict.
2. I closed my mom’s eyes after she died. For some reason, this was–and still is–very important to me.
3. I was the last person in my class to learn to read, and 10 years later aced the PSAT verbal section. Perseverance does pay off!
4. I procrastinate terribly–not because I’m lazy, but because I’m afraid I’ll screw everything up. Talk about self-fulfilling prophecies!
5. I think it is a disgrace that Pope John XXIII has not yet been canonized.
6. I took French in high school and college, and Spanish in college, and remember absolutely nothing of either. (edit 2012–I’m doing Rosetta Stone to try and relearn it all!)
7. When I was very little, I wanted to be both an astronaut and a ballerina. Simultaneously.
8. Yes, I really am a redhead. I’m partly Irish, after all.
9. I was engaged (to a millionaire’s son, yet) before I met George and called it off when I realized I’d rather be alone by myself than alone with somebody else. Oh, am I ever glad I waited!
10. I’ve always wanted to be a writer, in addition to whatever else I do with my life.
11.I began a search for my birth mother last year. I haven’t heard anything yet. (edit 2012–She is found, and we are very close!)
12. I feel a little disloyal to my mom for doing this, even though she always supported the idea and even offered to pay for it.
13. I make a mean homemade marinara sauce, with lots of onion and garlic.
14.I used to do lots of drawing with charcoal and pastels; I’d like to start doing it again, but for some reason I’m scared to. (Maybe I’m afraid I’ll, well, suck.)
15.If I could do college over again, I’d major in history or English and philosophy, instead of political science and philosophy. And I’d take four years of Latin, for fun. Yes, fun. (edit 2012–or maybe I’d just do four years of both French and Spanish!)
16. Sometimes I feel as though I am strangely invisible.
17. I never minded being an only child, until both of my parents were gone.
18. I played varsity tennis in high school, and was also in choir and yearbook.
19. I feel very connected to both of my grandmothers, although my maternal grandma died long before I was born, and my paternal grandma died when I was 16–almost 25 years ago.
20. I have ultra-sensitive skin that requires more pampering than a baby’s. Hair, too.
21. The only thing that REALLY makes my back feel better is massage and gentle yoga. And certain muscle relaxers, of course.
22. I would love to do freelance writing but have no idea how to begin.
23. One of the very best days of my life was the day I discovered that dark chocolate actually contains more antioxidants than green tea.
24.My biggest regret (aside from infertility) is that I was supposed to spend a college semester studying in London, which fell through when we couldn’t come up with the extra cash, and then later I was supposed to spend a whole week over New Year’s Eve staying in a friend’s flat in Paris, only to wind up in the ER the night before my flight with a bad case of influenza.
25. When I was 30 I had surgery to correct a crooked jaw–my scoliosis made the lower part of my face grow unevenly.(edit 2012–I actually had three surgeries to correct the kyphosis and scoliosis in my back when I was 17 and a senior in high school.)

books: 2008

  1. The Girl with the Pearl Earring, Tracy Chevalier
  2. Falling Angels, ibid
  3. Chronically Happy: Joyful Living in Spite of Chronic Illness, Lori Hartwell
  4. Please Understand Me: Character & Temperament Types, David Keirsey and Marilyn Bates
  5. Katherine, Anya Seton
  6. Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life, Anne Lamott
  7. Victorian London: The Life of a City, 1840-1870, Liza Picard
  8. Elizabeth’s London: Everyday life in Elizabethan London, ibid.
  9. Innocent Traitor: A Novel of Lady Jane Grey, Allison Weir
  10. The Lost Painting: The Quest for a Caravaggio Masterpiece, Jonathan Harr
  11. Thunderstruck, Erik Larson
  12. Isaac’s Storm: A Man, A Time, and the Deadliest Storm in History, ibid
  13. The Warrior Queens, Antonia Fraser
  14. Mary, Queen of Scots, ibid
  15. Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of the Sun King, ibid
  16. Journey From the Land of No, Roya Hakakian
  17. Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, Rebecca Wells
  18. Little Altars Everywhere, ibid
  19. Leaving a Trace: On Keeping a Journal, Alexandria Johnson
  20. The Hidden Writer: Diaries and the Creative Life, ibid
  21. Wisdom of the Celtic Saints, Edward Sellner
  22. Open the Door: A Journey to the True Self, Joyce Rupp
  23. Praying by Hand: Rediscovering the Rosary as a Way of Prayer, Basil Pennington, O.C.S.O.
  24. The Wounded Healer: Ministry in Contemporary Society, Henri J.M. Nouwen
  25. Compassion: A Reflection on the Christian Life, Nouwen, et al
  26. Called to Question: A Spiritual Memoir, Joan Chittister
  27. The Gift of Years: Growing Older Gracefully, ibid
  28. There is a Season, ibid
  29. The Story of Ruth: Twelve Moments in Every Woman’s Life, ibid
  30. The Dark Night of the Soul: A Psychiatrist Explores the Connection Between Darkness and Inner Growth, Gerald May, M.D.
  31. Kitchen Table Wisdom: Stories That Heal, Rachel Naomi Remen, M.D.
  32. How Much is Enough? Hungering for God in an Affluent Culture, Arthur Simon
  33. The Challenge and Spirituality of Catholic Social Teaching, Marvin L. Krier Mich
  34. Cloud of Witnesses, Jim Wallis and Joyce Hollyday
  35. Joan: The Mysterious Life of the Heretic Who Became a Saint, Donald Spoto.
  36. The Bible: A Biography, Karen Armstrong
  37. How Firm a Foundation: Leaders of the Liturgical Movement, Robert L. Tuzik, ed.
  38. Prayers of the Women Mystics, Rhonda De Sola
  39. Woman, Why Do You Weep? Spirituality for Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse, Sandra M. Flaherty
  40. Touching the Holy: Ordinariness, Self-Esteem, and Friendship, Robert J. Wicks
  41. Thirsty for God: A Brief History of Christian Spirituality, Bradley P. Holt
  42. Pilgrim’s Almanac: Reflections for Every Day, Edward Hays
  43. In Cold Blood, Truman Capote
  44. Hitler’s Willing Executioner’s: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust, Daniel Jonah Goldhagen
  45. Wait ‘Til Next Year, Doris Kearns Goodwin
  46. Light a Penny Candle, Maeve Binchy
  47. Tara Road, ibid
  48. Quentin’s, ibid
  49. Scarlet Feather, ibid
  50. Silver Wedding, ibid
  51. Evening Class, ibid
  52. The Glass Lake, ibid
  53. Firefly Summer, ibid
  54. Year of Wonders: A Novel of the Plague, Geraldine Brooks
  55. People of the Book: A Novel, ibid
  56. The Chronic Illness Experience: Embracing the Imperfect Life, Cheri Register
  57. Dim Sum, Bagels, and Grits: A Multicultural Adoption, Myra Alperson
  58. Lincoln: A Novel, Gore Vidal
  59. Attaching in Adoption: Practical Tools for Today’s Parents, Deborah D. Gray
  60. Life’s Companion: Journal Writing as a Spiritual Quest, Christina Baldwin
  61. Words in a French Life: Lessons in Love and Language From the South of France, Kristin Espinasse
  62. Coastliners: A Novel, Joanne Harris
  63. Five Quarters of the Orange, ibid
  64. Chocolat, ibid
  65. A Vision of Light: A Margaret of Ashbury Novel, Judith Merkle Riley
  66. In Pursuit of the Green Lion: A Margaret of Ashbury Novel, ibid
  67. The Water Devil: A Margaret of Ashbury Novel, ibid
  68. The Birth of Venus: A Novel, Sarah Dinanat
  69. Murder in the Rue De Paradis, Cara Black
  70. Murder in Belleville, ibid
  71. Murder in the Marais, ibid
  72. Murder on the Ile Saint-Louis, ibid
  73. Murder in Clichy, ibid
  74. Murder in Montmartre, ibid
  75. Entre Nous: A Woman’s Guide to Finding Her Inner French Girl, Debra Oliver
  76. Hardball: How Politics is Played by One Who Knows the Game, Christopher Matthews
  77. Lean Forward Into Your Life, Mary Anne Rademacher
  78. The Historian, Elizabeth Kostova
  79. Good Living With Fibromyalgia, Arthritis Foundation

All while typing this list I kept thinking of two of my favorite readers: Emilie, and my mom. “Oh, I’ve got to tell Emilie about this one,” I’d think, only to remember…I’ve had more time to get used to my mom’s death, but I still can’t help wanting to call her on the phone to tell her every time I discover an especially intriguing, complex, mystery story.

But still. Today, this is how I honor them, and the legacy they’ve left me, a legacy filled with love and appreciation for the power and mystery of language. And I’m grateful, too, for the many friends with whom I still share a mutual love of books, of delight in a cleverly turned phrase, in that magical feeling of discovering something new and traveling on a magic carpet–all thanks to our common love of the written (and spoken!) word.

And mom, it’s taken me many years, but I finally–well, mostly–forgive you for all those horrible puns.

(For an example of another friend who loves words, too, check out Liz’s beautifully written recent post.)

forty for forty

Oops! I made out my resolution list several weeks ago and then completely forgot to post it. I’ve never made birthday resolutions before, but hitting a milestone birthday has inspired me to take stock of where I am and where I want to go. So here goes!

  1. Keep up with gratitude journal somedays
  2. Complete adoption application, home study, and dossier still trying to come up with application fee
  3. Yoga occasionally
  4. Physical therapy exercises at least 5 days per week ummm…
  5. Volunteer for Barack Obama (GOTV effort) nope–migraines kept me in bed
  6. Begin spiritual direction done
  7. Paint living room, hallway next spring
  8. Send in grad school application for Master’s in Theology Program by December 1 make that December 30
  9. Find financial aid for grad school
  10. Celebrate 40th birthday in style done!!!
  11. Lose Prednisone weight by Christmas almost
  12. Apply for spiritual direction certificate program changed to pastoral ministry certificate program
  13. Cardio at least 5 days per week
  14. Strength training, 2 days per week
  15. Get mammogram done
  16. Organize photos
  17. Organize mom and grandma’s letters
  18. Obedience lessons for Fiona
  19. Eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables daily HA!!
  20. Check into infertility support group found online adoption support group
  21. Check into fibromyalgia support group
  22. Organize study
  23. Do The Artist’s Way
  24. Date night with George once a week
  25. Work on improving my Spanish, especially conversational maybe French, instead
  26. Send birthday cards ON TIME not even close 😦
  27. Update blog more often better
  28. Journal every day, even if for only a few minutes somdays
  29. Organize mom’s things, finally
  30. Explore ways to finance adoption looking at foster-adoption now
  31. Send five things for publication
  32. Read To Kill a Mockingbird, The Great Gatsby, The Sun Also Rises, Catcher in the Rye, Anna Karenina, and The House of Spirits
  33. Learn to knit
  34. Knit prayer shawl
  35. Become commissioned Eucharistic Minister
  36. Check into Basilica Befriender ministry yes
  37. Reconnect with college friends doing
  38. Keep to a regular sleep schedule getting much better
  39. Organize week using The Life Organizer by Jennifer Louden will probably never do
  40. Watch more comedies too many Law & Order reruns, still